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Full text of "The beamer : Bradford Durfee Textile School yearbook"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/beamerbradforddu1950brad 




Ex Libris 



1950 PIONEER 




BRADFORD DURFEE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



FALL RIVER 



MASSACHUSETTS 



PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE 



BRADFORD DURFEE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



MAY 1950 



Era 



Look not mournfully into the Past. 
It comes not back again. Wisely 
improve the Present. It is thine. Go 
forth to meet the shadowy Future, 
without fear, and with a manly 
heart. 

Longfellow. 



S^ N 



^ 



A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 




MR. LESLIE B. COOMBS 



to whom we dedicate 
OUR BOOK 



PRESIDENTS MESSAGE 

It seems quite appropriate that the resumption of the publishing of the senior year 
book should go along with the raising of the "educational sights" of the Institute. I want 
to congratulate the class of 1950, particularly those who were directly in charge of the 
project, for the fine piece of work they have done. 

It has taken a great deal of thought and hard work on the part of the Board of 
Trustees and the faculty to effect the transition of the school from the level of a voca- 
tional institution to one with full collegiate standing; one authorized to award the 
Bachelor of Science degree. While much has already been accomplished, there is still 
more to be done. It can only be accomplished through the united efforts of the alumni, 
the student body and the staff. Any medium through which information about the 
progress of the Institute can be desseminated is not only helpful but vitaly necessary if 
the Institute is to function as a progressive educational unit. It seems to me that one of 
the best ways to spread such information is through a well balanced year book. I 
sincerely hope that you graduates will keep in close contact with the Institute in the days 
ahead. Your constructive criticism can be very valuable. 



C&0& 




A MESSAGE FROM THE FACULTY 



DR. D. ALEXANDER SEVERINO 




The Class of 1950 should be congratulated for its efforts to re-establish for this 
Institute an annual student publication, The Pioneer. It might be well for us of the 
Faculty to evaluate our aims and our methods in terms of the spirit exemplified by "the 
pioneers" who leave us at the mid-century mark. 

The continued growth and development of the Institute depends upon the loyalty 
and the continuing support of our graduates as well as the vision of our Administration 
and the efforts of our Faculty. May you continue to exercise to best advantage for 
yourselves and for your communities the skills, knowledge, and ideals that you have 
begun to develop with us. 



-ZD. 




'^C&^-vC&Z*^ 



THE FACULTY 




Seated (left to right)— Mr. John J. Crawford, Dr. Elizabeth Adams, Mr. Frederick Winter, 

Dr. James W. Watters, Dr. D. Alexander Serverino, President Leslie B. Coombs, Mr. 

John W. Norman, Mr. Frank H. Dillon, Mr. Harold C. Smith, Mr. Rudolph L. LaVault, 

Mr. Albert A. Stewart. 
Standing (left to right)— Mr. Kenneth Tedford, Mr. John Greenhalgh, Mr. George A. 

Weaver, Mr. John W. Ferguson, Mr. Walter J. Cass, Mr. Bertram B. Hardy, Mr. 

William J. Wingate, Mr. John G. Stickler, Mr. Eugene R. Williams, Mr. Louis S. J. 

Simeone, Mr. Samuel A. Stone. 
Absent were— Mr. Walter E. Marston, Mr. Robert E. Cooper and Mr. Claude Wagner 

when photo was taken. 



7<^ Senear filate> 



n 



SMTI LIBRARY 



SENIOR CLASS HISTORY 



In '46 our class started its story, 

And in '50 left the school in a blaze of glory. 

Those four years were full of fun and fret, 

Our first day in school we'll never forget. 

The talk by Dean Coombs 

The hunting for classrooms, 

Questions and answers, foolish and wise— 

And for cutting classes our alibis. 

The soccer team we started in '46 

With instructors helping take the kicks. 

How it improved as years went along 

With Coach Simeone helping make it strong! 

And the Cosmos Club we did initiate 

So foreign students and Americans could congregate. 

The Christmas parties with their skits 

That threw us into laughing fits, 

And don't forget that our class 

Made the Distaff come to pass. 

Who can forget the pledges in Phi Psi 

Wearing shoelaces instead of a tie. 

Final exams and then vacation, 

But first a little syncopation 

As in Stone Bridge Inn we prance 

At the first Annual Dinner Dance. 



The second year when we returned 

The rumors flew and our ears burned. 

We're getting a new building and degrees 

And all the students this did please. 

And the Harvest Hop with its Queen 

Pretty enough to be on a Hollywood screen. 

And the Varsity Club to pay for sweaters 

For athletes who earned their letters. 

By this time starting new clubs wasn't rare 

So we formed a chapter of A square T. C. square, 

And Epsilon Phi Pi we did organize 

So that all races and creeds could fraternize. 

And the Higgins Trophy we won that year 

While we all went to the games to cheer. 



Mr. Norman at the Christmas party 

Reciting a poem hale and hearty. 

The Xmas Dance with Santa there 

And all the girls looking bright and fair. 

Exams, dinner dance, and on vacation we darted 

We returned and the new building still wasn't started. 



And none can forget that wonderful sight 

Of New Bedford and Durfee together one night. 

For a dance in the country club hall, 

A fine time was had by all. 

And then to add to our class' fame 

The A. C. S. our chemists did frame. 

And that year a tennis team we did get 

To whack the ball right over the net. 

And when the junior year ended for the summer 

Some of our group left with a diploma. 

When we returned for our senior year 

We started to work on the "1950 Pioneer" 

The first yearbook since we became an institute 

We hope that future classes will follow suit. 

The Engineering Society came into being 

So that educational programs we'd be seeing. 

And under Mr. Williams' painstaking labor 

Our fencing team learned to use the saber. 

And running dances we did not stop 

Our dances that year were full of "bop", 

A concert dance given by Phi Psi, 

And a Patriots Dance by Epsilon Phi Pi. 

And then came exams and graduation 

We even had a convocation. 

We graduated in cap and gown, 

Our commencement was really done up brown. 

Our class day and faculty tea 

Were really very nice to see 

And thus we closed one chapter in our story 

Looking forward to future glory. 



12 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 




President William A. Renaud 

Vice-President Henry P. Cichon 
Secretary-Treasurer Richard Rogers 

13 



VINCENT CATALANO 
"Chip" 

Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 

President, 3 

Secretary, 2 
Social Committee, 3, 4 
Distaff, 3 

Bowling League, 4 
Year Book Committee, 4 





HENRY P. CICHON 
"Mike" 

Class Vice President, 4 
Year Book 

Activities Manager, 4 
Engineering Society, 4 

Vice President, 4 
Baseball, 2, 3 
Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4 

Captain, 2, 3 
Varsity Club, 2, 3, 4 

President, 3 



PHILIP A. CLORITE 
"Phil" 

Engineering Society, 4 
Year Book Committee, 4 
Bowling League, 4 
Basketball, 1 

Assistant Manager, 2 
Baseball, 3, 4 
Varsity Club, 2, 3, 4 
Epsilon Phi Pi, 4 



14 





LEONARD C. CONNORS 
"Len" 




A.A.T.C.C., 1, 2 



J 



t. 



JOHN W. CONROY 
"Jack" 

Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Vice President, 2 





MARCEL L CROTEAU 
"Mars" 

Engineering Society, 4 
Social Committee, 2 
Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3 
Varsity Club, 2, 3, 4 
Secretary-Treasurer, 2 



15 



HAROLD T. CUSHMAN 
"Cush" 

Vice President of Athletic Association 

and Social Union, 3 
Class Vice President, 2 
Engineering Society, 4 

Secretary-Treasurer, 4 
Year Book Committee, 4 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Baseball, 1, 2 
Soccer, 1 , 2, 4 
Varsity Club, 2, 3, 4 

President, 2 



______g__g____ 






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JM ,};■'■•■ 


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t0- 1 




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PAUL N. DARGIE 
"P. N. D." 

1st Chairman A.A.T.C.C., 3 
Program Chairman A.A.T.C.C., 4 
Program Chairman A.C.S., 4 
Year Book 

Photography Manager, 4 
Distaff, 2, 3 
Social Committee, 4 



ROBERT A. DUBREIUL 
"Dube" 



Fencing Team, 4 
PAGE 17 




16 




CONRAD J. GAGNON 
"Pete" 

Varsity Club, 3, 4 

Engineering Society, 4 

Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 

Treasurer, 2 

Baseball, 1, 2, 

Basketball, 1 



HOWARD ESSIG 
"Howie" 

Distaff, 1, 2 

Managing Editor, 1 
Basketball Manager, 3 
Tennis Team, 3, 4 
Varsity Club, 4 
Year Book Committee, 4 
Bowling League, 3, 4 





WESLEY M. GARDNER 
"Wes" 



/A.v_.O. f O/ ^r 



17 




JULES S. GLICK, B.S. 



A.A.T.C.C, 4 
A.C.S., 4 




DONALD C. GRIME 
"Grimsey" 

Engineering Society, 4 
Social Committee, 1, 2, 3 




GEORGE B. GREGORY 
"Jeep" 

Engineering Society, 4 
Year Book Committee, 4 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Baseball, 2 

Soccer Manager, 3, 4 
Varsity Club, 2, 3, 4 
Secretary-Treasurer, 3 



18 





WILLIAM JONES, JR. 
"Bill" 

Engineering Society, 4 



GEORGE A. JORDANIDES 
Cosmopolitan Club, 3, 4 
A.A.T.CC, 4 





EDWARD L KELLEY 
"Kel" 

Phi Psi Fraternity, 2, 3, 4 

Treasurer, 3 
2nd Chairman, 4 
Distaff, 2, 3 



19 



SHAFEER KHOURY 
"Pete" 





BERNARD LEVESQUE 
"Barney" 

Cosmopolitan Club, 1 

Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 



FREDERICK L MASON, JR. 

Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Bowling League, 3, 4 
Engineering Society, 4 
Year Book Committee, 4 



20 





FRANCIS McHENRY 
"Mac" 

Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Cosmopolitan Club, 3, 4 
Secretary, 4 




john t. Mcdonald 

"Mac" 



Baseball, 1 
A.A.T.C.C, 3, 4 









V- 







CHARLES MELLOR 
"Charlie" 

President of Athletic Association and 

Social Union, 3 
Engineering Society, 4 
Soccer, 3 

Manager, 2 
Baseball, 2 
Basketball, 2 

Manager, 4 
Varsity Club, 2, 3, 4 



21 



RENE MORIN 
"Chubby" 

Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 

Vice President, 4 
Cosmopolitan Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 

President, 3 
Social Committee, 1, 2 
Bowling League, 3, 4 

President, 4 
Year Book 

Business Manager, 4 





MIRIAM MURPHY 



Secretary, 3 
Social Committee, 2 



EDMUND C. PICKARD 



Engineering Society, 4 



22 





JOHN D. POWERS 



Engineering Society, 4 



JAMES M. QUIGLEY 
"Sparks" 

Cosmopolitan Club, 2, 3 
Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Bowling League, 3 





ELMER J. REISER 

Engineering Society, 4 
Student Assistant, 4 



23 



WILLIAM A. RENAUD 
"Bill" 

Class President, 3, 4 

President of Athletic Association and 

Social Union, 4 
Soccer, 2, 3, 4 

Captain, 4 
Varsity Club, 2, 3, 4 
Phi Psi Fraternity, 2, 3, 4 
Year Book 

Editor, 4 
A.A.T.CC, 4 
Bowling League, 3, 4 





RICHARD ROGERS 
"Buck" 

Engineering Society, 4 
Class Secretary-Treasurer, 4 



LYNWOOD CARL ROOT 



'Lyn' 

Engineering Society, 4 
Bowling League, 3, 4 



24 





JOHN 


S. SOUZA 


// 


Curl/' 


Engineering Soc 


iety, 4 


Class President, 


2 


Soccer, 1, 2, 4 




Baseball, 1, 2 




Varsity Club, 2, 


3,4 



DAVID E. SNYDER 
"Dave" 

Epsilon Phi Pi Fraternity, 3, 4 
Engineering Society, 4 





HERMAN SUNDELSON 
"Sundy" 

Epsilon Phi Pi Fraternity, 3, 4 
Distaff, 2 

Bowling League, 4 
Basketball, 3 



25 



ARTHUR H. SWINBURN 
"Swinny" 

Engineering Society, 4 

President, 4 
Soccer, 1, 2, 3 
Varsity Club, 2, 3, 4 






/Milk 




r * ■*3fe-~ngg2. 




IP* 








I Yfl 


^SfcjJ 





MURRAY J. WAKS 
"The Kid" 

Epsilon Phi Pi Fraternity, 3, 4 

Vice President, 3 
Cosmopolitan Club, 3, 4 

Vice President, 4 
Bowling League, 

Secretary, 4 
Year Book Committee, 4 



DONALD T. TWEEDY 
Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 



26 





SANFORD J. H. WELDON 
"Sandy" 

Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Distaff, 2, 3 




EVERETT E. WARING 

Engineering Society, 4 
Varsity Club, 2, 3, 4 
Baseball, 1, 2 




ROBERT L WILKEY 
"Wilk" 

Year Book Committee, 4 
A.A.T.C.C., 2, 3, 4 
Baseball, 1 



27 



ROBERT A. WILKINSON 
"Wilkie" 

Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Cosmopolitan Club, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Distaff, 1, 2, 3 

Business Manager, 1 

Managing Editor, 2 

Photography, 3 





RAYMOND E. WISHART 
Phi Psi Fraternity, 1, 2, 3, 4 



28 



*7&c Tirtdendatemw 



29 



Junior Class Officers 




President Edward Cowell 

Vice-President Theodore Williamson 

Secretary Alfred J. Slowe 

Treasurer Robert Staples 



Junior Class History 



30 



The class of '51 is now three quarters of the way through school. We have given 
a good account of ourselves so far, and expect to leave a permanent mark of our 
passage on B. D.T.I. 

To begin with, ours was the first class to enter its freshman year with the knowledge 
that it was starting the first leg of a four year course, terminating with a degree. Also, 
we think ours will be the last class having a sizeable proportion of Veterans on the rolls, 
and probably the last class having prospective graduates who were married before they 
entered the school. Those of us who were married— some of us proud Papas, at that— 
when we began the course, have looked on in some amusement as our classmates 
have taken unto themselves wives. But we think we are the last of our kind. 

In the field of social activities we are quite proud of our record. B.D.T.I. is now 
big enough to support two fraternities, and the class of '51 assisted in the successful 
organization of the Epsilon Phi Pi Fraternity. At the time of writing the Presidents of 
both fraternities are member of this class. Robert Staples, president of Phi Psi Delta 
Chapter, and Joe McKenna, president of Epsilon Phi Pi. Of this we are quite proud. 
All the dances sponsored by our class have been highly successful, our only complaint 
being that there have been too few of them. We are an extremely talented group, 
having several musicians of professional quality, and at least one movie-director-star. 
The latter, of course, is Bill Moran, whose efforts were acclaimed by the Engineering 
Department. 

Sportwise, we have proved ourselves versatile, quite capable, and enthusiastic. 
Seven members of the class are active with the basketball squad. Outstanding, of 
course, are Harold Peterson and Alec Smith, who have played with the team for three 
seasons. They played on the team which won the S.N.E. Coastal Conference, in '48. 
While we haven't managed to repeat that performance, our team is still a fine one. 
Morris Cohen, Robert Gauthier, Ernie Vigeant, Jay Kneen and Al Slowe are well-known 
to the followers of the basketball team. 



THE JUNIOR CLASS 




To baseball we contributed Ted Williamson, Ernie Vigeant, Joe McKenna, Robert 
Lebrun, Roger Larrivee, Gordon Shepard, Robert Gauthier and Bob Madowsky 
(the manager). 

We sent only two men into action with the soccer team, Harold Peterson and 
Ernie Vigeant, but mustered four men for the newly organized tennis team— Ernie 
Vigeant (what again?), Bill Corner and Henry Walker. The fencing team is also 
something new for Bradford Durfee, but even so we found two men who were both 
eligible and able for it— Jay Kneen and Carmen Rendino. 

The Class of '51 has seen a number of changes come to B. D.T.I. We have watched 
the expansion of the staff, the curriculum, and the addition of much new machinery 
in all departments. We are proud of our help in enlarging the extra-curricula activities. 

Congratulations to the senior class for the fine work they have done. We, who 
have made a good start in the right direction, hope to finish with as good a record. 



31 



Sophomore Class Officers 




President Everett S. Arnold 
Vice-President Ernest Howarth 
Secretary-Treasurer Earl Bilsky 



Sophomore Class History 



You are trapped in a room with one hundred and four squabbling, squealling 
freshmen. Your heart beats faster and faster as a distinguished looking man raps on 
the podium. You are in a position from which there is no escape. 

You sit there, sweating, frantic, as President Coombs tells you of your next four 
years at the institute. Your chair becomes a prison cell and you try vainly to escape but 
there is no escape. You see the futility of trying to escape without an education so you 
sit back and decide to listen. 

You leave this room with the other men to follow your chosen course. Your 
first five or six weeks are the hardest because you are confused. You are meeting 
new class mates every day and are becoming acquainted with Tech life. Some of you 
escape from arduous hours of study by going out for soccer or by indulgence at the 
Bijou. To escape all the homework bestowed upon you by the kind, helpful professors 
is impossible, but you try. 

Your life during the freshman year consists of SATS, ANSVA, of Avogodro's 
theory, of freely falling bodies and acceleration, of cotton and wool, of paragraphs 
by comparison and finally of the binomial theorem. After sixteen weeks of this you 
find yourself confronted with mid-year exams. After this grind is over you seek an 
escape from the gruelling hours of study. However, your period of relaxation is 
short-lived because of that horrible practice of sending the grades home. As the 
second semester begins you decide to settle down and really hit those books. Before 
you realize it, the balmy spring weather beckons to you and naturally you accept its 
invitation— more escape. April runs into May, and May runs into trouble. Once again 
you don't eat or sleep, but spend day and night memorizing and re-reading bygone 
information. You struggle through the finals and then head for home. At last you 
have escaped, at least until next September. 

The vacation whizzes by and once again you are in a room with quiet, unassuming 
sophomores. But what happened to forty-two of your fellow class mates? There are 
now only but sixty-two of you for the class of '52. 



32 



THE SOPHOMORE CLASS 




By now you know the routine and you take the situation in hand. Studies come 
easier and you find more time for extra-curricular activities. Some of your best friends 
are elected officers: Everett Arnold, becomes president, Ernest Howarth, becomes vice 
president, and Earl Bilsky, becomes secretary-treasurer. You offer congratulations and 
wish them loads of luck in their future undertakings. To "glenn gellis" you give appre- 
ciation for the winderful job he is doing as editor of the Distaff. To Jack Wachsburger, 
Bob Ashley, Eddie Levell and Neil Murphy you offer cheers as they help the Tech 
hoopmen on to victory. To Norman Reis you offer condolences for the loss of his 
"Wringer". 

It is at this point that your history stops because history is news from the past and 
you are looking forward to the future. A future which you hope will be a pleasant and 
creative one. "YOU" are the class of '52. 



33 




FRESHMAN 



Student Actiwtceb 





Alfred E. Higgins 



The Higgins Memorial Trophy 
was donated in 1948 by Mr. Alfred 
Higgins, in memory of his son, Dr. 
Ralph Ritter Higgins 




36 




BASKETBALL 



Although this year's basketball season was not as fruitful as that of 1947-48, 
when the boys of the Blue & White captured the Southern New England Coastal 
Conference title, the Tech hoopmen can well be proud of their present record. Despite 
the fact that the opposition this year was better than average, and the loss of Russ 
Booth to the Army did hurt the team tremendously in the scoring column, the team 
succeeded in defeating ten out of their fifteen opponents. 

The Tech hoopmen showed great promise in defeating Edgewood Jr. College, the 
General Line Officers School of Newport, Bryant College, Worcester State, Bridgewater 
State, Lowell Textile, and New Bedford Textile, but as the season wore on, it was 
impossible to hold back the onrush of such capable squads as Stonehill College, 
Brooklyn College, and Philadelphia Textile. 

The high scorers for Tech this season are George Gregory, Murray Cohen, and 
Alex Smith with 245, 200, and 192, respectively. High scorer for a single game was 
Gregory with 31 points. 

The squad consists of the men in the above picture. First row: Ed Levell, Bob Anger, 
Art Soares, Bob Sullivan, Bob Kenyon; rear: Charles Mellor, student manager, Jack 
Wachsburger, Murray Cohen, Hal Cushman, George Gregory, Alex Smith, Harold 
Peterson, Neil Murphy, and Coach Bannister. Also on the squd are Harold Hall, Bob 
Ashley, Alan Sussman and John Conforti. 



37 



BASEBALL 



Durfee Tech's '49 baseball team failed to win a game. Tech 
lost five during the course of their abbreviated early season schedule. 
Somewhat of a moral victory was obtained when Tech played Becker 
College of Worcester to a scoreless tie. 

Tech opened the season at Lowell, April 12, 1949, by absorbing 
a 20-1 lacing at the hands of Lowell Textile. It was Tech's lack of 
support that lost the game, as the pitchers allowed but seven hits. 
The scoreless tie, mentioned previously, was played after this. In a 
close game, played at Bridgewater State, Tech was nosed out by 
the tune of 4-2. Ted Williamson was outstanding, lashing out two 
hits and scoring an equal number. In the return engagement, Bridge- 
water again emerged victorious, 7-2. Tech's fourth loss was at the 
hands of New Bedford Textile, 9-6. Yankopoulos made his first start 
for Tech and pitched great ball for six innings but weakened in the 
later stages of the game. In this losing cause, Phil Clorite banged out 
three hits and Henry Cichon belted a home run. 

Tech's final setback was at the hands of Assumption College. 
This was the thriller of the year, with the Worcesterites edging Tech, 
5-4. Both teams made a total of twenty-two hits and only sparkling 
plays on the part of both teams held the score down. 

Despite the '49 season everyone is looking forward to a terrific 
year in '50. Many highly regarded freshmen constitute the nucleus of 
the coming year's squad. 

The past season's roster consisted of pitchers Roger Larrivee, Red 
Gauthier, Bill Wall and Yank Yankopolos; catchers Bob Le Brun, Bill 
Talbot and George Levasseur; infielders Joe McKenna, Phil Clorite, 
Dan BinkofF, Marc Croteau, Art Franco, Ted Williamson, and Hank 
Correa; outfielders Gordon Shepard, Henry Cichon, and Tom Stanton. 



38 




SOCCER 



Inspired by the firm determination of Coach Simeone to have his team play a clean, 
hard and winning brand of ball, the '49 Soccerites enjoyed one of the most successful 
seasons of its history. The record of 8 wins, 1 tie, and 1 loss, with a total of 34 goals 
scored against the opposition and but only 8 goals on the opposite side of the ledger 
shows that Tech was strong both offensively and defensively. 

Tech opened the season against Brown University, winning a thriller, 1-0. This 
goal, as most of the other deciders, was scored by Tech's brilliant center forward, Ed 
Kokoszka. This victory against Brown was a great psychological factor in the play 
of the boys during the remainder of the schedule. Bridgewater State was fortunate in 
holding Tech to a 1-1 tie here at Fall River. They were later blasted 5-3 at Bridgewater. 
Bridgeport University proved tough but had to yield finally to Tech's power. This game 
was the thriller of the year. It was played in a driving rain storm against a top notch 
team. 

Suffolk University, Rhode Island College of Education, and Lowell Textile were 
easy pickings for Tech as the three game total was 22-0. 

Arch-rival New Bedford Textile, unbeaten and unscored upon during the season 
clashed with Tech before a large home town gathering. In the hard fought game Tech 
emerged victorious 1-0. Somewhat angered by this setback, New Bedford turned the 
tables to win the return engagement, 4-0. This was Tech's only loss. The season closed 
at St. George's Academy with a 3-0 win. On this field four of our seniors played their 
first game in 1946 and their last game in 1949. 

Mention and praise should be given these men who were active in four years of 
varsity play. They are forwards Marcel Croteau and John Souza; defensemen Henry 
Cichon and Harold Cushman. 



39 




TENNIS 



A few enthusiastic students of the sport of the racket formed the tennis club in the 
spring of '49. In the process of development the following officers were elected: presi- 
dent, Henry Reis; and secretary-manager, Jack Steinberg. Mr. Grenhalgh became our 
coach. 

That first year a few practices were held, and a hurried four game schedule was 
drawn up. Considering the circumstances, the boys bearing the blue & white faired 
reasonably well, winning two out of four. 

The 1950 schedule discloses a group of formidable opponents. A total of eight 
matches are listed. Suffolk University, Edgewood Junior College, New Bedford Textile, 
and Bridgewater State Teachers College will be our opposition. It is our intention to 
make tennis a major sport at B. D.T.I. 



40 




FENCING 



Fencing had its start at Tech late in the 1948 school year. At that time Mr. Williams, 
an instructor, sent out feelers to get an idea if there would be sufficient interest in the 
institute to support the sport. Approximately ten students indicated their desire to 
form a team. But it was not until early in the current school year that a squad was 
organized and things began to take shape. 

Under the direct supervision of Coach Williams, practices were held regularly 
at the YMCA. Robert Dubreuil was elected co-captain along with John Kneen, and 
Barney Poritz became manager. The main weapon employed by the squad is the foil. 

Beside the coaching and practice had at the "Y", several trips were made to 
Boston and Worcester by members of the squad attending fencing clinics held in those 
cities. Overcoming the many obstacles of preliminary organizing, the squad hopes to 
give the students of Tech the countless number of thrills that accompany a fencing 
match. 



41 




BOWLING 



OFFICERS 

President Rene Morin 

Vice-President Murray J. Waks 

Secretary-Treasurer Glenn Gel lis 



42 



The fall semester of 1948 saw B.D.T.I.'s athletic program expand to include a 
bowling league which met weekly at the Durfee Alleys. Arthur Codega, Rene Morin 
and Glenn Gellis were elected officers of the organization. The teams were comprised 
mostly of class groups and the keen air of competition which grew rapidly was observed 
both on and off the alleys. The final weeks of the school year saw the Engineers and 
the Looms running almost neck and neck. At the end of the season the Engineers went 
on to victory with a final explosion of timber. The year culminated with a succulent 
banquet and with the presentation of trophies to the winning teams. 

The success of the past year was the initiating and sustaining factor of the '49-'50 
season. More teams entered the league and the alleys soon rocked with enthusiasm 
and spirit. Bonds of friendship were formed, social barriers were broken as the teachers 
pitted their wisdom and. experience against the strength of youth. The arduous job of 
scheduling the weekly games and compiling statistics was given to the officers. Regard- 
less of the outcome of this season, or any season, bowling is here to stay. The only 
intramural sport at Durfee Tech offering an opportunity for everyone to partcipate 
and to show his prowess has built a very strong foundation. Our pride in its standing 
can only be exceeded by our hope that other sports may be built on the same basis. 



VARSITY CLUB 



One of the most recent organizations in the Institute is the Varsity Club. The 
Club was formed as a result of a few athletes' untiring efforts to convince the students 
that such an organization would be beneficial to the school and to the athlete. The 
following are the aims of the Varsity Club: (1) to promote better sports and greater 
participation in sports at B.D.T.I., and high standards of sportsmanship; (2) to establish 
a means of awarding suitable tokens in recognition for participation in athletic activities; 
(3) to establish means by which members may keep in contact with each other and 
exchange information. 

The requirements for membership is a Tech "T", awarded to deserving students 
participating in either one of the three major sports at the Institute. These sports are 
soccer, basketball, and baseball. 

During the three years that the Club has been in existence, the organization has 
awarded 70 sweaters to players representing Durfee Tech on the athletic field. The 
current school year Club officers are: president, Alexander Smith; vice-president, 
Harold Peterson; secretary-treasurer, Roger Larrivee. 




43 




SOPHOMORE 




ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 

President William A. Renaud 

Vice-President Joseph H. McKenna 

Secreta ry Ernest Howa rth 

Representative Alfred Slowe 



The student body is the Athletic Association. It is governed by an Advisory Board 
which is elected by the students and consists of a President, Vice-President, Secretary, a 
student representative and Mr. Wingate as Faculty Advisor. Under the constitution, the 
President must be a member of the Senior Class, the Vice-President, a member of the 
Junior Class, the Secretary, a member of the Sophomore Class, and all officers must have 
a high scholastic standing. 

The duties of the Association are to finance and control all athletic and social 
events of the school. In regard to athletics, the Association buys all the equipment 
necessary to maintain the various sports, pays for the transportation and meals of the 
players at out-of-town games, insures the athletes against injury, and outfits the 
cheerleaders. On the social side of the school life, the Association holds the annual 
Christmas Party for all students, the Junior Prom, the Commencement Ball, and the 
various informal dances during the year. 

The Athletic Association also handles such matters as the standardization of the 
school ring and emblem, the financing of the student publication— the Distaff, and con- 
ducts the general assembly meetings. 



45 




PHI PSI 



The Phi Psi Fraternity was founded by five students of the Philadelphia College 
of Textile Engineering on March 18, 1903. The aims of the fraternity are to promote 
good fellowship, social gatherings, mutual advancement of its members, and the art of 
textile manufacturing. In 1905 the Fraternity was incorporated under the laws of 
Pennsylvania. Beta Chapter was organized in 1904 at the New Bedford Textile School 
and the same year Gamma Chapter at Lowell Textile School was also admitted. Delta 
Chapter, here at B.D.T.I., was organized in 1909. Phi Psi is the largest and most 
respected textile fraternity in the world. 

During World War II, the Institute's chapter became dormant. This is easily under- 
stood when one considers the fact that the average graduating class consisted of four 
or five students. However, shortly after the war, Delta Chapter was reactivated and 
since then it has increased its enrollment and activities. 

The crowning achievement of the Chapter was the procuring of a club-house, 
which provides the thirty-eight members with an excellent place to gather for business 
and social meetings. Numerous smokers, dances, and concerts are presented to the 
public by the fraternity. These activities are climaxed by district and national conven- 
tions. These conventions enable members to become acquainted with brothers from all 
parts of the country. It is the aim of the Delta Chapter to be a credit to the Fraternity 
and to the Institute. 

The 1949-'50 officers are: president, Robert Staples; vice-president, Rene Morin; 
treasurer, John Hinves; secretary, Alfred Slowe. The Fraternity advisor is Mr. Wingate. 



46 



EPSILON PHI PI 



During the years 1945-50 college fraternities throughout the country underwent 
a tremendous upheaval. The old traditions, suspicions, and prejudices began to dis- 
appear and were substituted by a clear, forthright outlook. Changes were made and 
precedents broken. The old restrictions rooted on racial discrimination and religious 
differences were removed. 

Our Epsilon Phi Pi Fraternity, a non-sectarian professional textile fraternity, was 
an offspring of this movement. The ideals of freedom, fidelity, and friendship were 
not made into uplifted walls hypocritically concealing the darkness of discrimatory 
sentiments, but rather these ideals were made the expressions of true feelings which 
initiated and sustained the fraternity. 

Epsilon Phi Pi was organized at Tech in April, 1948 and chartered by the State 
of Massachusetts. The history reveals unquestionable progress. The efforts of the twenty 
charter members were fulfilled in a very short period of time. In two years the member- 
ship was doubled even though the educational requirements were made difficult. Meet- 
ings of a professional nature took the place of the previous get-togethers for the sole 
purpose of a good time, and men of high caliber, both in the educational and pro- 
fessional field were accepted as honorary members. 

With the formation of the Chapter Beta in the Philadelphia Textile Institute, with 
feelers in other colleges, and with the at last, but mostly deserved acceptance of our 
organization as a professional fraternity, not a social one, a bright future looms ahead. 




47 




COSMOPOLITAN CLUB 



The Cosmopolitan Club was formed at the Bradford Durfee Technical Institute in 
1946 by a group of foreign students in cooperation with American students. Since 
its founding the club has prospered, and at the present time there are twenty-five 
members. 

The purpose of the club is to establish warm friendships between students coming 
from different countries of the world and to stimulate in these students ideals of 
intellectual achievement and social development. The Club is non-sectarian and non- 
partisan. Student membership is half foreign students and half Americans. In regard 
to membership sought by Americans, priority is given to those knowing a foreign 
language. 

The Cosmopolitans meet regularly once a month during the college year. The 
Club's social activities include several dinners sponsored by the Rotary Club, Kiwanis 
Club, Lions Club, and other organizations of Fall River. 

The officers this year are as follows: Criton D. Spiliotis, Greece, president; Murray 
Waks, U.S.A., vice-president; Aung Kin, Burma, treasurer; Francis McHenry, U.S.A., 
secretary. Mr. Louis Simeone serves as faculty advisor. Countries represented are 
Greece, Egypt, Hondouras, Finland, France, and the United States. 



48 



ENGINEERING SOCIETY 



The advance of the Engineers is on! No, not an Army "D-day" or the like, but 
nevertheless just as spectacular in its own right. In a school where textiles predominate, 
the engineers have at last emerged from their lethargy and have united to elevate 
themselves in the standards of the school and the world without. 

The Engineering Chapter of Bradford Durfee Technical Institute is a prime cause 
of this unification. The organizing of this engineering chapter is in itself a great 
advancement. With the accomplishment of its aims and purposes, the Chapter will 
indeed make tremendous progress. 

Its Aims and Purposes 
Purposes: To consolidate the engineers of the Bradford Durfee Technical Institute. To 

affiliate the chapter with a National organization. 
Aims: To aid the school in its activities. To further develop friendship between its 
immediate members and other societies of the school. To promote the further 
education of engineering, mostly on the practical side, through movies, lectures, etc. 
Aims through its affiliations with a National organization: 

To give the engineers first hand information as to the opportunities in the field of 
engineering. To help engineers obtain jobs. 

High aims and purposes? Yes, but at the head of the Engineering Chapter of 
Bradford Durfee Technical Institute there are officers that are very capable of handling 
the affairs of the chapter and carrying out these aims and purposes. The officers are: 
Arthur H. Swinburn, President; Henry P. Cichon, Vice-President; and Harold T. Cushman, 
Yeoman of the Organization. 

The advance of the Engineers must not stop. We look into the future and predict 
the ultimate success of this, the engineers first big step. 




49 




AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 



In April, 1876, thirty-five chemists met in New York City to form the American 
Chemical Society. Since its beginning the Society has become the world's largest 
organization devoted to a single science. The aims of the Society are: (1) to encourage 
in the broadest and most liberal manner the advancement of chemistry in all branches; 
(2) to promote research in chemical science and industry; (3) to improve the qualifica- 
tions and usefulness of chemists through high standards of professional ethics, educa- 
tion, and attainment; (4) to increase the diffusion of chemical knowledge and (5) by 
its meetings, professional contacts, reports, and publications, to promote scientific 
interests and inquiry. 

A student benefits by becoming a member of a Chapter of Student Affiliates in 
the following ways: (1) he receives journals and periodicals published by the Society; 
(2) he gains the privilege of attending national, regional, divisional, and local section 
meetings of the Society on the same basis as an A.C.S. member; (3) he receives the 
privilege of using the A.C.S. Employment Clearing House, an agency which has been 
very helpful in aiding students to locate positions after graduation; and (4) he gains 
experience in preparing and presenting technical material before audiences of chemi- 
cally-trained people. 

The B. D.T.I. Student Chapter of the American Chemical Society was organized at 
the beginning of this school year (September, 1949) with thirteen members. Future 
activities will include lectures and movies presented by members and men in the 
industry. Officers for the current year are: chairman, Jack Moss; vice-chairman, Donald 
T. Tweedy; secretary-treasurer, Stanley V. Dubiel, Jr. Chapter advisor is Dr. James 
Waters. 



50 



Si./i.l .c.c. 



The history of the Student Chapter of the American Association of Textile Chemists 
and Colorists of B.D.T.I. dates back to April 12, 1948, at which time the Chapter was 
accepted by the parent organization. During the early months of '48 a small group 
of students banded together and through the efforts of Paul Dargie and Mr. Wingate 
the Chapter was formed. Then through the combined efforts of the early members the 
Chapter grew to be one of the largest organizations at B.D.T.I. 

The A.A.T.C.C. is a national organization and offers its members contact with 
many prominent men in the Textile Field. It is a society which helps the members 
exchange ideas and problems. The student chapter offers its members literature on 
the latest developments in textiles, it teaches the student the arts of leadership and 
cooperation. The student chapter invites men of the industry to come to the Institute 
to give lectures on widely diverse topics which help the student in his work at college, 
and also help him to plan for his future work. The lecturers give much practical infor- 
mation not obtainable in books— "Knowledge through Experience". 

The present officers are: Edward Kelly, chairman; Richard Barber, secretary; Stanley 
Dubiel, treasurer; and Mr. Wingate, faculty advisor. 




51 




DISTAFF 

In March of 1947, the same year in which Tech vaguely began to awaken to 
college life, the first issue of the Distaff was published. The idea for the newspaper 
originated with Dave Sanders, then a freshman textile engineer. 

A news staff was formed and two issues were published during the spring semester 
of 1947. Sanders continued as Editor in 1948 and the Distaff got down to business of 
reporting and reflecting the news about B. D. T. I. The burden of starting and pulling 
the newspaper through its initial year was too much for any one person and the Distaff 
went on the skids in 1948-49. The quality of reporting dropped. The fact that little 
or no cooperation was given to the editors can be blamed for the lessening in the 
number of issues. Serious flaws in the format became evident and it was not until 1950 
that the Distaff underwent a complete metamorphosis, and became a representative 
college newspaper. 

The present officers, who pulld the Distaff out of its literary depression, pictured 
above are: Robert Madowsky, Stanley Dubiel, Mr. Walter Cass, Mr. Rudolph LaVault, 
Harry Martin, Glenn Gellis, and Criton Spiliotis. 



52 




1950 PIONEER STAEF 

Editor-in-chief William A. Renaud 

Art Manager Glenn Gellis 

Business Manager Rene Morin 

Activities Chairman Henry P. Cichon 

Photography Chairman Paul Dargie 



53 




JUNIOR 




SENIOR 



SENIOR CLASS DIRECTORY 



NAME 

Catalano, Vincent 
Cichon, Henry P. 
Clorite, Philip A. 
Connors, Leonard C. 
Conroy, John W. 
Croteau, Marcel L. 
Cushman, Harold T. 
Dargie, Paul N. 
Dubreuil, Robert A. 
Essig, Howard 
Gagnon, Conrad J. 
Gardner, Wesley M. 
Glick, Jules S. 
Gregory, George B. 
Grime, Donald C. 
Jones, William, Jr. 
Jordanides, George A. 
Kelly, Edward L. 
Khoury, Shafeek 
Levesque, Bernard 
Mason, Frederick L, Jr. 
McDonald, John T. 
McHenry, Francis 
Mellor, Charles 
Morin, Rene 
Murphy, Miriam 
Pickard, Edmund C. 
Powers, John D. 
Quigley, James M. 
Reiser, Elmer J. 
Renaud, William A. 
Rogers, Richard 
Root, Lynwood C. 
Souza, John S. 
Snyder, David E. 
Sundelson, Herman 
Swinburn, Arthur H. 
Tweedy, Donald T. 
Waks, Murray 
Waring, Everett, E. 
Weldon, Sanford J. H. 
Wilkey, Robert L. 
Wilkinson, Robert A. 
Wisehart, Raymond E. 



ADDRESS 

364 East 21 Street 
497 Penn Street 
215 Ridge Street 
747 June Street 
396 Snell Street 
788 Eastern Avenue 
107 Colfax Street 
67 Middle Street 
631 Tower Street 
2 Pinehurst Avenue 
212 Nelson Street 
360 Buffington Street 
131 W. Kingsbridge Rd. 
232 Mt. Pleasant Street 
Gardner Neck Rd. 
87 Sevigney Street 

521 June Street 
403 Quequechan Street 
66 Carl Street 
293 Kilburn Street 
861 Locust Street 
538 June Street 
137 Winter Street 
35 Cottage Street 
448 New Boston Rd. 
155 Silver Street 
So. Main Street 
2029 Bay Street 
Myricks Street 
616 Prospect Street 

109 Winthrop Street 
627 Woodman Street 
242 Garden Street 
65 Jesup Place 
276 So. Beacon Street 
5 Monabrock Avenue 
254 Beach 15th Street 
35 Charlotte Street 
Water Street 
75 Haffards Street 

Quaker Avenue 



CITY & STATE 

Paterson, New Jersey 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Pawtucket, Rhode Island 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
New York City, New York 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Somerset Centre, Mass. 
Bronx, New York 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Swansea, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Athens, Greece 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Manville, Rhode Island 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Taunton, Massachusetts 
Assonet, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Assonet, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Little Compton, Rhode Island 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Bronx 52, New York 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Taunton, Massachusetts 
Far Rockaway, L. I., N. Y. 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Assonet, Massachusetts 
Fall River, Massachusetts 
Springvale, Maine 
Tiverton, Rhode Island 



59 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



The preparing and editing of the 1950 PIONEER has been a 
task that required the help of many who contributed to the successful 
completion of this book. Space does not permit us to single out all 
of them here but we feel that we could not let this opportunity pass 
without thanking those who by their whole-hearted cooperation con- 
tributed greatly to the volume you are now reading: 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Cass who contributed much time proof- 
reading and editing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marcel Croteau who did considerable typing. 

Howard Essig who was a general help in all departments. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Reis whose typing aid was invaluable. 

Saheed Studios who took many pictures for the PIONEER. 

John Silvia whose photographic aid was indispensible. 

Murray Waks who was always in the right place at the right time. 



60 



FOR UNBROKEN CONTINUITY 
OF SERVICE - - 



JOHNSON WARP SIZERS 

are known and used by efficient mills throughout 

the world. 

They're good for long years of continuous, 
trouble-free sizing of delicate warps, with 
few broken ends and an absolute minimum 
of mechanical adjustments or parts re- 
placements. 

THE ULTIMATE IN SIZER DESIGN 

PIERCY and HOLSMAN STREETS 
PATERSON NEW JERSEY 



61 



A 



TEXT 



for better 



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CARLtON H1U 



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'Reg. Trade Mark! 



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Compliments of 



ABBOTT MACHINE COMPANY 



WILTON, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Southern Office: Greenville, South Carolina 



-BALFOUR- 

"Known wherever there are Schools and Colleges" 

DISTINCTIVE JEWELRY 

CREATED BY THE SKILLED HANDS 

OF BALFOUR CRAFTSMEN 

Commencement Announcements — Diplomas 

Personal Cards 

Club Insignia — Medals and Trophies 

Represented by: 
TOM GALVIN 

L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

ATTLEBORO, MASS. 



63 



CARBIC COLOR & CHEMICAL CO. INC. 



451-53 WASHINGTON STREET 



NEW YORK 13, N. Y. 



INDIGOSOLS 



PHARMASOLS 




Dyestuff Makers Since 1859 



64 



Compliments 
of 



ctMWm 

FALL RIVER'S LARGEST DEPARTMENT STORE 

Est. 1877 



Compliments 
of 

MEYER JAFFE 



Compliments 
of 

ARNOLD, HOFFMAN & CO. INCORPORATED 

PROVIDENCE RHODE ISLAND 



Compliments 
of 

COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. OF FALL RIVER 



65 



Compliments of 




FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



HOME STYLE COOKING AT LOWEST PRICES 



THE SUGAR BOWL 



1276 PLEASANT STREET 



Fall River, Mass. 



SAHEED STUDIO 

"Portraits You'll Treasure" 

Hudner's Building Rooms 19-20-21 

130 South Main St. Fall River, Mass. 



GET YOUR BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 



AT THE 



COLLEGE BOOKSTORE 



Operated by the 



Bradford Durfee Technical Institute 



Compliments 
of 

CHERRY & WEBB 



COLLINS BROTHERS MACHINE 
COMPANY 



647 Roosevelt Avenue 



Pawtucket, R. I. 



High Speed Twisting Machinery for Cotton, Wool 

and Mohair — Novelty Yarn Twisters — Change Overs 

Worsted Spinning — Twisting and Roving Frames 

from Cap or Flyer to Ring 



66 



Compliments of 

SCHOOL CAFETERIA 

John Perry, Prop. 



DURFEE ALLEYS INC. 

340 CENTRAL STREET 
Fall River, Mass. 



Success to the 1950 Graduates 



CREAMRICH RESTAURANT 



SOMERSET CENTRE 



Compliments of 

S. S. KRESGE CO 



71 South Main St. 



Fall River, Mass. 



BESSE-RUSSELL'S 

Men's and Boys' Clothing and Furnishings 
221-223 South Main St. Fall River, Mass. 



Compliments of 

GRANITE BLOCK SPA 

33 So. Main St. Fall River, Mass. 

Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge 



MONGEAU SHOE STORE, INC. 

"Known for Better Shoes" 

236 So. Main St. Fall River, Mass. 

Tel. 6-8161 



ELL-MAR MEN'S SHOP 

Tom Ellison 

Home of Kuppenheimer Clothes 

154 So. Main St. near Borden Fall River, Mass. 



67 



Compliments of 

GORIN'S 



281 South Main Street 



Fall River, Mass. 



Compliments 
of 

NONPAREIL 



Compliments 
of 

STATE LUNCH 



NORA'S 
COLONIAL RESTAURANT 

Home Cooking 
162 Bank Street Tel. 2-2861 Fall River, Mass. 



Compliments of 

HARBOR TERRACE RESTAURANT 

Specializing in Italian and American food 
Corner of Bank and Green 



Best Wishes on Your 
First Year of Publication 

WALTER C. FRAZE 



SMITHS DRUG STORE 

"The Medicine Shop" 

Every Drug Store Need 

— Opp. Public Library — 






Just a 

FRIEND 



68 



I. F. MORIN FURNITURE STORE 

N. Giard, Prop. 

Complete House Furnishings 

46 Main Road, near State Line North Tiverton, R. I. 

Tel. North Tiverton 2-4869 



Your Headquarters for Sportswear and Clothing 
Quality at Sensible Prices 

AL DAVIS, INC. 

10 No. Main St. Durfee Theatre Building 



Compliments of 

NEW YORK TELEVISION CORP. 



415 South Main Street 



Fall River, Mass. 



Compliments 
of 

SHORE'S MARKET 



Compliments of 

BRAYTON & FERGUSON INC. 

COTTON 



Compliments of 
RICHARD H. FITTON, Prop. 

FRANK T. ALBRO & CO. 

COTTON MERCHANTS 



MASON'S 



PLYMOUTH AVE. at RODMAN ST. 



Compliments 
of the 

GRADUATING CLASS OF 1950 



69 



THE NAME THAT SYMBOLIZES 




OUTSTANDING LEADERSHIP IN 



FOR THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY 



SOUTHERN SHUTTLES 



PARIS PLANT 



GREENVILLE, S. C. 
A Division of 
STEEL HEDDLE MFG. CO. 



Compliments of 


SUCCESS AND BEST WISHES 


RIVEREDGE PRINTERS, INC. 




Textile Screen Printing 


♦ 


<fr 


Compliments of 


Plant: New York Office: 


HOTEL MELLEN 


206 Globe Mills Avenue 1450 Broadway 




Fall River, Massachusetts New York 18, N. Y. 




Telephone 3-5886 Phone BRyant 9-7710 









70 




e&i&dAite^-* 



produ 



cer 
of fine 
combed cotton 

fabrics 



broadcloths 

lawns 

batistes 

dimities 

handkerchief fabrics 

marquisettes 

dotted and plain 



FINE SPINNING ASSOCIATES INC. 



voiles 
organdies 



Turks Head Building, Providence, R. I. 40 Worth Street, New York, N. Y. 



LARGEST SPORTING GOODS STORE IN RHODE ISLAND 

QUINN'S INC. 

Established 1900 

ATHLETIC GOODS — SPORTING GOODS — SCHOOL TEAM OUTFITTERS 

FISHING TACKLE — GOLF & RIDING APPAREL 

235 WEYBOSSET STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



Adams Bookstore 

North Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

S. Baron & Son 

7 Morgan St., Fall River, Mass. 

Bijou Restaurant 

162 N. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

Harry Burstein 

67 Shawmut St., Fall River, Mass. 

Central Hat Shop & Shoe Repair 
18 No. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

Central Lunch 

354 Central St., Fall River, Mass. 

Central Photosupply 

Anawan Street, Fall River, Mass. 



DIRECTORY 



Empire Men's Shop 

168 S. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

Freed's Men Shop 

395 S. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

Hande Shoppe 

23 So. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

Hank and Elaine 
Jewett City, Conn. 

Harold and Marc 

B. D. T. I., Fall River, Mass. 

Just a Friend 

S. Macri 

453 S. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

Martin & Sullivan 

16 No. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 



J. V. Moore 

Compliments of O. D. P. 

Park Cafe 

490 S. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

Smith's Restaurant 

60 No. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

Treadeasy Shoe Shop 

29 So. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

Wilcox Pharmacy 

158 N. Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

Wilcox Stationery Co. 

120 Bedford St., Fall River, Mass. 

Paul Woltman 

Walters Super Service 

495 Pleasant St., Fall River, Mass. 



71 




AUTOGRAPHS 



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72 



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